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Creatine Elite - The Endurance Athlete's Creatine

Regular price $ 12.99 USD Sale

PRE-ORDERS ONLY. Estimated delivery of 12/2018. 

  • 100% Pure Creatine Monohydrate
  • No fillers or excipients
  • Enhances Stamina & Delays Fatigue*
  • Increases Strength, Power, and Recovery*
  • Supports Intracellular Hydration*
  • 30 Servings Per Container
  • Unflavored - Add To Your Favorite EndurElite Product Or Beverage
  • Read More About Creatine And Endurance Here

Creatine is not just for weightlifters and bodybuilders. It’s good for all types of athletes. In fact, a very strong argument can be made that everyone should be taking creatine for its wide array of health benefits in addition to performance enhancement. Creatine’s function is to form creatine-phosphate, which can then be used to quickly replenish ATP within muscle, and other, cells. By replenishing ATP, muscles are able to push harder and longer. Creatine also helps many other areas, including:

  • Increases Muscle Hydration
  • Accelerates Glycogen Resynthesis
  • Protects the Brain from Acute Trauma
  • Reduces Muscle Damage
  • Builds Stronger Bones
Most importantly, creatine improves fatigue resistance, muscular endurance, maximal oxygen consumption, and anaerobic power output, contrary to popular belief. This is why the high-level endurance athletes are all using creatine while remaining strategically quiet about it – they’re gaining a competitive edge! Now you can too, with Creatine Elite! There are many forms of creatine out there, but none has ever outperformed the original, creatine monohydrate. You won’t find anything else in Creatine Elite, no additives whatsoever, just the purest and highest quality product available.
Creatine Monohydrate (5g) – Creatine is the second most researched supplement on the planet (just behind caffeine). Creatine increases the cellular energy pool. This leads to a bevy of advantages. Specific to endurance athletes include the benefits of improved oxygen consumption, hydration, power, and muscular endurance!

I thought Creatine was bad for endurance because it causes weight gain?

Creatine does retain water within the muscle cell. This is not necessarily a problem for 2 reasons. First, better hydration has known benefits for endurance athletes, and more fluid at the beginning of an event widens the margin for error for hydration during a race. In other words, we know all-too-well that rehydrating during races is a pain! Creatine can reduce the total volume of fluid that needs to be ingested. Second, water weight can be mitigated by using smaller doses of creatine of 2.5-3 grams. See the next question!
 
What is the best way to use Creatine Elite?

For best results, take 1 serving per day as a dietary supplement. To minimize storing extra water, take ½ serving per day. For more advanced protocols, see our article on Creatine Elite.
 
Why isn’t Creatine a featured ingredient in PerformElite? Shouldn’t creatine be taken pre workout?

PerformElite does not contain any creatine chiefly because research shows better results when creatine is supplemented post workout. Secondary to that reason, EndurElite firmly believes in efficacious dosing. Creatine can be efficacious at a wide range of doses, each with varying degrees of “costs” and benefits. We believe that decision is best made by the athlete, which is also why you won’t find Creatine in RecoverElite.

  1. van Loon, L. J., Murphy, R., Oosterlaar, A. M., Cameron-Smith, D., Hargreaves, M., Wagenmakers, A. J., & Rodney, S. N. O. W. (2004). Creatine supplementation increases glycogen storage but not GLUT-4 expression in human skeletal muscle. Clinical science106(1), 99-106.
  2. Lopez, R. M., Casa, D. J., McDermott, B. P., Ganio, M. S., Armstrong, L. E., & Maresh, C. M. (2009). Does creatine supplementation hinder exercise heat tolerance or hydration status? A systematic review with meta-analyses. Journal of athletic training44(2), 215-223.
  3. Volek, J. S., Mazzetti, S. A., Farquhar, W. B., Barnes, B. R., Gómez, A. L., & Kraemer, W. J. (2001). Physiological responses to short-term exercise in the heat after creatine loading. Medicine and science in sports and exercise33(7), 1101-1108.
  4. Law, Y. L. L., Ong, W. S., GillianYap, T. L., Lim, S. C. J., & Von Chia, E. (2009). Effects of two and five days of creatine loading on muscular strength and anaerobic power in trained athletes. The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research23(3), 906-914.
  5. Juhász, I., Györe, I., Csende, Z., Rácz, L., & Tihanyi, J. (2009). Creatine supplementation improves the anaerobic performance of elite junior fin swimmers. Acta Physiologica Hungarica96(3), 325-336.
  6. Mero, A. A., Keskinen, K. L., Malvela, M. T., & Sallinen, J. M. (2004). Combined creatine and sodium bicarbonate supplementation enhances interval swimming. Journal of strength and conditioning research18(2), 306-310.
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  9. Watanabe, A., Kato, N., & Kato, T. (2002). Effects of creatine on mental fatigue and cerebral hemoglobin oxygenation. Neuroscience research42(4), 279-285.
  10. Schneider–Gold, C., Beck, M., Wessig, C., George, A., Kele, H., Reiners, K., & Toyka, K. V. (2003). Creatine monohydrate in DM2/PROMM A double-blind placebo-controlled clinical study. Neurology60(3), 500-502.
  11. Chilibeck, P. D., Chrusch, M. J., Chad, K. E., Davison, K. S., & Burke, D. (2005). Creatine monohydrate and resistance training increase bone mineral content and density in older men. The Journal9(5), 352-355.
  12. Deminice, R., Rosa, F. T., Franco, G. S., Jordao, A. A., & de Freitas, E. C. (2013). Effects of creatine supplementation on oxidative stress and inflammatory markers after repeated-sprint exercise in humans. Nutrition29(9), 1127-1132.
  13. Ayoama, R., Hiruma, E., & Sasaki, H. (2003). Effects of creatine loading on muscular strength and endurance of female softball players. Journal of sports medicine and physical fitness43(4), 481.
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  15. Graef, J. L., Smith, A. E., Kendall, K. L., Fukuda, D. H., Moon, J. R., Beck, T. W., ... & Stout, J. R. (2009). The effects of four weeks of creatine supplementation and high-intensity interval training on cardiorespiratory fitness: a randomized controlled trial. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition6(1), 18.

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