SustainElite X - Formulator's Cut

Regular price $ 69.99 USD Sale

Product Details:
  • 30 Grams Of Highly Branched Cyclic Dextrin. A High Density, Low Osmolality Super Carb
  • Digest & Absorbs Rapidly To Fuel Working Muscles*
  • 30mg Of Infinergy DiCaffeine Malate For Extended Energy & Endurance*
  • Zero Stomach Distress Or Bloating*
  • Electrolytes To Maintain Cellular Hydration & Blood Volume*
  • Light, Refreshing Flavor

SustainElite X is a zero sugar, advanced sports drink formulated to fuel your athletic performance. With 30 grams of the super carb highly branched cyclic dextrin, 30mg of sustained-release caffeine as Infinergy DiCaffeine Malate, and a comprehensive electrolyte blend; SustainElite X will keep you going strong from start to finish!

Highly Branched Cyclic Dextrin – Cluster Cyclic Dextrin is a specialized carbohydrate with a demonstrated benefit over the common carbohydrate, maltodextrin. Unlike maltodextrin, CCD does not inhibit lipolysis all while maintaining an equally high molecular weight (~55,000) and fast gastric emptying time, which is important to avoid stomach cramps. When put to the test, CCD improves time until exhaustion vs. an equal amount of glucose.

Infinergy DiCaffeine Malate – Infinergy (Di-Caffeine Malate) is a precise combination of caffeine and malic acid fused together using an ionic bond into a compound known as di-caffeine malate. Infinergy contains approximately 75% caffeine and 25% malic acid by molecular weight. The malic acid in Infinergy works to buffer the salts in caffeine, allowing for easier digestion while also replenishing the energy produced by caffeine, which helps to minimize the dreaded post-caffeine energy ‘crash’.In comparison to caffeine anhydrous, Infinergy is a milder form of caffeine that has a longer-lasting stimulatory effect without the excessive "jitters" side effect that many users experience with caffeine anhydrous. 

Electrolytes – The major electrolyte minerals include sodium, chloride, potassium, magnesium, and calcium. In addition to the prevention of cramping, each has its own unique function. Sodium is the primary intracellular mineral, while potassium is the primary extracellular mineral - both promote hydration. Calcium has numerous roles, but the most relevant to exercise is its responsibility for initiating muscle contractions. Chloride is the most abundant negatively charged ion with several roles in gut function and cell homeostasis. Last but not least, magnesium is a co-factor for hundreds of reactions, most of which are related to nutrient metabolism, muscle and vascular tone, and antioxidant synthesis.

What is the best way to take SustainElite X?

1-2 servings of SustainElite X should be mixed in 10-30oz of water and consumed gradually during exercise for each hour of exercise. Those exercising at higher intensities or have more muscle mass are those who might be interested in using a second serving per hour. 

What's the difference between SustainElite & SustainElite X?

The main difference between our original SustainElite formula and SustainElite X is the use of one carbohydrate source (highly branched cyclic dextrin) and the inclusion of caffeine in the X version. 

What makes SustainElite X unique? Why should I use it?

You should use SustainElite X if you’re someone who exercises or races for 1-2 hours. SustainElite X contains 30 grams of the super carb Highly Branched Cyclic Dextrin to maintain constant fuel delivery to active muscles without over- or under-shooting needs.

My SustainElite X isn't dissolving completely? Is this normal and what should I do?

Yes, this is completely normal. Do the following steps to get SustainElite X to dissolve 95%.

  1. Add 16-24 ounces of water to a bottle (ALWAYS DO THIS FIRST).
  2. Add a blender ball.
  3. Add 1 scoop of SustainElite.
  4. Shake vigorously for 20-30 seconds.
  5. Let it sit for a couple of minutes.
  6. Shake again for 20 seconds.

You can also mix your SustainElite in hot water and shake for 20 seconds. This will make it 100% soluble. Just add ice and cold water after if needed.

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